Polymer 80 v1

We're sorry, midwayusa. Learn how you can enable Javascript. Eligible for. Feel the difference the second you pick it up! The Polymer80 PFv1. This system is designed as a complete kit. Unlike the Glock, this frame includes a uniquely extended beaver-tail, and most notably a super tactical pistol grip rather than the standard Glock styled pistol grip.

Even better, this pistol grip includes a built in flared magwell for speed loading. This feature will surely be a favorite amongst competition shooters who require speed and accuracy. The jig is included in the price of this system. The kit comes with drill bits and the end mill bit that's required to finish your Glock project the right way. Videos 1. Add to Cart for Special Price. Additional charges for Non Free Shipping products, products shipping to remote locations, HazMat products, and large or heavy items still apply.

See Details. One Time Offers have limited quantities available and usually once they are sold out, they are not offered again.

MDX Arms G17 V1 9mm Full Size 80% Builders Kit

Made in USA. Notify Me. Add to Wish List. Let us help! Chat Now. Additional Information. Owner's Manual. Was the information on this page helpful?Our MDX Arms build kit includes everything you need except magazines. No more brass in the face! MDX Arms does not sell firearms. We're not responsible for any improper milling, installation of parts, damage or any injury that might occur. Received everything as expected with a free gen4 ejector as well! They installed the sights and the channel liner for me.

Polymer 80 finished and test fire!

Crazy good customer server! I was a bit disappointed with the polymer80 kit. They are definitely not as cookie cutter and simple as people have made them out to be. The locking block was so far out of spec that I had to contact polymer80 to have it replaced. There is a lot of work that goes into making one of these and it may never get to the same reliability and accuracy as an OEM Glock. For a first time build, it takes way more than a couple hours and there is a lot of troubleshooting. The only thing that would have made this a 5 star review is if it would have came with written instructions.

Created with Sketch. Toggle menu Gift Certificate Login or Sign Up 0. You save. Current Stock:. Quantity: Decrease Quantity: Increase Quantity:. Share This Article. Product Videos. Custom Field. You May Also Like Quick view. MDX Arms.

Choose Options. Recommended Quick view.I have to admit, that after seeing the Polymer 80 PFc frame in person, I had to get one. Polymer 80 was gracious enough to send one to me for review. The PFC frame came in 3 colors at the time, so I opted for gray, more colors have been added since then.

One must first machine the frame to get it to function. When I first received the frame, I noticed that it came with all the tools needed to finish it out. The only thing missing was a drill press or a dremel tool.

The kit includes a plastic jig that the pistol sits in. This jig is a one time use type of deal, but works really well. Basically you pull up the online instructions and go from there. Brownells also has a video series on machining the frame. First thing I did was drill the holes.

Drill each hole from each side of the jig, don't think that you can just drill through the whole thing. Next, I actually took a mill and machined off the four "nubs". One can use a file, a dremel, or a drill press with a vise for this also. The last machining step is probably the hardest. In this step they have you mill out the recoil spring channel.

Just pay close attention and you'll be fine. I had to dremel the channel out some more after I installed the locking block so that the recoil spring moved smoothly.

I figured that you can always remove more material, but you can't add material. After the machining steps are done, it on to installing parts. Just drop this in and install the front pin.

Also in the kit is a Rear Rail Module.No doubt you've seen percent AR lowers. They've taken many forms over the years from simple forgings to billet pieces in various states of completion. If the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives BATFE has a special calculation as to the difference between an percent lower and an or percent lower, they haven't shared it with us.

A notable example of this in the AR world was the EP Armory percent lower that utilized two different colors of polymer: one that needed to be drilled and milled out, and the other that didn't.

It was only a matter of time before we saw percent Glock lowers for sale. There've been some scratch-made Glock receivers built in the past, with materials ranging from sheet steel to converted airsoft lowers the latter was harder than you'd think.

Polymer 80 first wet its feet with AR lowers and more recently moved into the world of Glock. There've been a few third-party complete Glock receivers, all with varying levels of success and failure, but Polymer 80 has produced the first commercially available percent: the Spectre.

Likely by the time of publication, they'll have a Glock sized option available. Though it might look like a lot of work to the uninitiated, there's not too much required to bring this project to completion. All the small parts and pieces you'll have to provide yourself, as well as the slide and barrel assembly. Not every DIY project one undertakes has to be done solely for cost savings; the pure pleasure of working with your hands is enough for many.

Still, there may be those worried about prospective bans, and perhaps more who simply like the idea of having a legal, homemade gun for personal use subject to your state laws — like the Ghost Guns California State Senator Kevin de Leon is so worried about.

Complete slides are readily available online and can ship directly to your door. The magazine catch spring, one of the simplest parts, was the hardest to source. For those without a box o' parts, some aftermarket shops have started selling receiver completion packages. Some resellers seem to do little more than separate the slides and receivers and sell them separately.

Of course, a ton of aftermarket slides and barrels are out there. We decided it would be best to go with an OEM slide to minimize possible issues with fitment. The Spectre frame isn't just a facsimile of the OEM model.

It has a larger gripping area, no finger grooves, an integral beavertail and magwell, and a full Picatinny rail. It's also available in a variety of colors. Just giving the kit a glance over, it doesn't seem like there's actually too much to do — mill off the front bits that stick out, drill three holes, and machine the rail in the back.

The rail is what we expected to give the most trouble, in no small part, because while a traditional Glock handgun frame is mostly polymer, the rear rails themselves are metal. The Polymer 80 webpage has links to video instructions, which we dutifully watched for 30 seconds before deciding to just dive right in.

Let's talk about how we did, where we messed up, and how to avoid the same pitfalls yourself. You can see why a clamp is recommended to keep the jig tight around the frame.Not because they are terrible, or that they have problems, or anything of the sort.

Some people like the Glock grip angle and trigger mechanism; those people are weird. But be that as it may, the platform is functional, boringly reliable, and robust. Glock firearms are good guns. I suppose that if I am to delve into the world of Glock, it would benefit me to do so using a gun that both is and is not a Glock… a Not-Glock, if you will.

Kind of like a semi-do-it-yourself gun. So, the primary goal of this project much like the KS47 is to build up a Not-Glock 19 on the PFC frame using as little money as possible. The build process begins quite simply. They also include an end mill bit and two drill bits corresponding to the appropriate size pin holes. Since I am a terrible blogger and terrible millennial in general, I failed to document any of the finishing process. Shame on me. In the meantime, look at how jaggedly awful I cut the recoil spring channel:.

Now that the frame is complete, the assembling of parts begins! To complete this gun, the following will need to be procured:. The first and best deal I found and am most proud of is the slide. Anyone who has built a custom Glock will know that slides are NOT cheap. It would also need a finish, so the price would only go up from there. The Suarez bare slide was slowly becoming the best option until I stumbled upon one hell of a find: 80percentglock.

I mean, come on. Once the slide came in, I was blown away. The serrations were hard and crisp, the sight cuts were immaculate, and the slide just glowed in its own majesty.

Just so you know, the blemished sale seems to be gone, but keep your eyes peeled for the next time they become available. They are excellent slides for very little money.

I chucked the slide into a vise, drifted the rear sight in with a punch, and cut two notches in the front sight screw so I could use a security bit to tighten it into place. It was a pretty rough cut, and had the slide not been nitrided, it would have marred up the inside a bit. All that remains are the Barrel and recoil spring. I want a threaded barrel for this build. Because why not? The difference in price between unthreaded and threaded aftermarket Glock barrels is insignificant.

There are quite few manufacturers that make quality aftermarket barrels for very little money. These are all fine and dandy, however, there is one barrel that is wooing me, and it is wooing me hard. Faxon has a barrel that is god-awful ugly. It is rainbow finished, it has weird dimple fluting, and its hideous… and I want it.

First order of business is to find where the barrel binds up. In this case, the locking lug and hood on the barrel fits VERY tight in the slide.

Pop the barrel out, and with a Sharpie of your color choice I chose blueink up the contacting faces on the locking lug and barrel hood.No doubt you've seen percent AR lowers. They've taken many forms over the years from simple forgings to billet pieces in various states of completion.

If the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives BATFE has a special calculation as to the difference between an percent lower and an or percent lower, they haven't shared it with us. A notable example of this in the AR world was the EP Armory percent lower that utilized two different colors of polymer: one that needed to be drilled and milled out, and the other that didn't. It was only a matter of time before we saw percent Glock lowers for sale. There've been some scratch-made Glock receivers built in the past, with materials ranging from sheet steel to converted airsoft lowers the latter was harder than you'd think.

Polymer 80 first wet its feet with AR lowers and more recently moved into the world of Glock. There've been a few third-party complete Glock receivers, all with varying levels of success and failure, but Polymer 80 has produced the first commercially available percent: the Spectre.

Likely by the time of publication, they'll have a Glock sized option available. Though it might look like a lot of work to the uninitiated, there's not too much required to bring this project to completion. All the small parts and pieces you'll have to provide yourself, as well as the slide and barrel assembly. Not every DIY project one undertakes has to be done solely for cost savings; the pure pleasure of working with your hands is enough for many.

Still, there may be those worried about prospective bans, and perhaps more who simply like the idea of having a legal, homemade gun for personal use subject to your state laws — like the Ghost Guns California State Senator Kevin de Leon is so worried about.

Complete slides are readily available online and can ship directly to your door. The magazine catch spring, one of the simplest parts, was the hardest to source.

For those without a box o' parts, some aftermarket shops have started selling receiver completion packages. Some resellers seem to do little more than separate the slides and receivers and sell them separately. Of course, a ton of aftermarket slides and barrels are out there. We decided it would be best to go with an OEM slide to minimize possible issues with fitment. The Spectre frame isn't just a facsimile of the OEM model.

polymer 80 v1

It has a larger gripping area, no finger grooves, an integral beavertail and magwell, and a full Picatinny rail. It's also available in a variety of colors. Just giving the kit a glance over, it doesn't seem like there's actually too much to do — mill off the front bits that stick out, drill three holes, and machine the rail in the back. The rail is what we expected to give the most trouble, in no small part, because while a traditional Glock handgun frame is mostly polymer, the rear rails themselves are metal.

The Polymer 80 webpage has links to video instructions, which we dutifully watched for 30 seconds before deciding to just dive right in. Let's talk about how we did, where we messed up, and how to avoid the same pitfalls yourself. You can see why a clamp is recommended to keep the jig tight around the frame.

An old inch tabletop drill press, Dremel tool of coursea drill press vice, and some clamps. The idea was to put the end mill bit into the drill press, secure the jig in the vice, raise the drill press table itself to achieve proper height, and move the vice itself around to perform the milling.

Polymer 80 Build Kit $399.99

The jig wasn't a perfect fit, so the clamps ensured it fit tightly around the incomplete frame as we went. We're talking plastic here, so you don't have to mill this area down in 40 passes like you're working something like hardened steel.

Still, a few slow passes makes for much cleaner work. We did bobble it a couple times and you can see the scars on the jig itself.

polymer 80 v1

Oh well, it's single use anyway. Go slow if you want a job clean enough to show off to your friends. When drilling the holes, ensure you're perfectly lined up — it's probably best to drill each side separately.

One of the holes we drilled through without being perfectly level, making for a larger headache later. Then came milling the rear rails. While you'll be cleaning up this area later during fitting, this isn't something you want to mess up. Go nice and slow.Aug 4, 25 comments. Buy Here! I need a jig to finish this gun.

polymer 80 v1

Can you please recommend one? Thank you. Would you be willing to sell the frame, slide, and barrel alone? Do the polymer 80 builds fit standard glock iwb holsters? Wanting a p80 g19 inside the t rex arms sidecar or maybe the axis? The only issue i see is the shape of the trigger guard.

How difficult is it to complete this build? I currently have a 5th gen G19 and know my way around that platform. This would be my first P80 build and I am definitely interested!

Their site says priority shipping. Any advice? I bought it and it showed up 11 day later their site says day Priority Shipping…. The trigger assembly would not work at all. I took it to two professionals, and they said the trigger is way out of spec the trigger bar was too long to fit the gun properly. When we tried to make an adjustment the trigger broke. Has anyone purchased this kit from this website? Great Kit Thanks Tactical Toolbox. Sights and slide parts are already installed, but the lower needed to be drilled and you have to install those parts yourself.

Your email address will not be published. DeJuan Glover on August 4, at am. Do they have this kit for the SS80 build?? Jonathan on August 4, at pm. Kat Belle on August 4, at pm. Thomas on August 7, at pm.

Says it comes with the jig Kat. Jas on August 4, at pm. Hank A. Vince Lopez on September 11, at pm. Would I need a ffl for this?


Replies to “Polymer 80 v1”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *